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An eggcellent dish!

Here at Chez Maison Bleue we like to source our produce locally.

We get our eggs from two suppliers. The main one is a man on Mirepoix market who has a small holding.

The reserve supplier is our neighbour here in Sonnac sur l’Hers, and were it not for the walnut tree in the farmers garden we could actually see the hens from our terrace.

The eggs we get are superb with lovely golden yolks that are not the result of artificial colouring.

Those who follow my blog will know how the eggs make great meringue; well the whole eggs are fabulous for omelettes.

Our guests seem to really enjoy the herb omelette we serve for breakfast.

The herbs are cut from where we grow them on the terrace only when the omelette has been ordered.

Some guests even enjoy choosing the combination of herbs themselves.

If you have theses nice fresh ingredients it gives you a head start in producing a great omelette.

The key to a first rate omelette is to get the pan fairly hot and give the eggs a thorough whisking so when you pour them in the pan there are lots of air bubbles visible.

Then as soon as it is in the pan draw a fork through it and keep doing this.

You will scrape the cooking omelette in towards the centre and allow the raw egg on the top to hit the hot pan.

Keep on doing this until the egg will no longer run into the gap.

Then allow it to cook for a few minutes until it is a light golden brown on the underneath.

For the herb omelette I start by briefly frying the herbs in a little oil and then leave them in the pan and pour the egg mix on top.

At Easter here in Sonnac sur l’Hers we have a village gathering, aperitifs followed by salad and barbecued meat but the highlight is the sweet Easter omelette.

This is made with a hefty lot of castor sugar added to the eggs and then the cooking is just like a normal omelette to start with.

The best bit is the finish when it is flambéed in the local eau de vie produced from pears grown in the village.

It is a good job that most people walk to the event as the amount of eau de vie that goes into it would definitely put you over the limit!

This year we had our aperitifs outside in the sunshine, so Easter is a great time to visit.

The eau de vie is distilled by the man who arrives with his mobile still in November.

The weather can still be quite warm even then and there is often an evening gathering of locals round the still which gets more and more animated as the produce is tested, so come in November too!

As a desert at our B&B here in the Languedoc I serve a sweet omelette. Mine uses an ingredient for which our neighbouring region of Provence is famous, lavender!

You can make it by gently frying a few lavender flower heads for a minute and then adding the egg and sugar mixture and cook as per a normal omelette.

Flambé is optional and use what spirit you like but one with a delicate flavour.

The omelette has a gorgeous sweet scented flavour, and as lavender grows really well here it too is cut fresh to order.

So whether you want sweet or savoury get cracking and make some omelettes.
 

By Nick Fardon
Published: August 9, 2012

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