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Sunday, 26 October 2014

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Plans for 320 new homes in Cockermouth

Plans were due to be submitted today for up to 320 new homes in Cockermouth.

Adam McNally 3005
CONSULTANT: Cockermouth resident Ramon Skillen, left, and Adam McNally, of Story Homes, at last year’s consultation

Story Homes wants to build a mixture of two to five-bedroom homes north of Strawberry How.

The firm announced last May that it wanted to build up to 400 homes on the 39-acre site.

A public consultation attracted about 300 people and most were against the proposal.

Some said that the town could not cope with so many new homes and that having only one access road to Strawberry How would cause major traffic problems.

Another consultation was held in September and Story Homes said it had refined its plans to address key concerns raised in both.

A spokesman said: “A package of measures is proposed to promote site accessibility including a new bus service and a range of pedestrian and cycle route improvements to connect the site with the surrounding area.

“The plans are to provide a wide range of quality houses in a sensitively planned and attractive environment that will offer an excellent choice in the housing market and help meet latent housing needs, including up to 40 per cent affordable housing.”

Plans were expected to be submitted to Allerdale council today.

The firm is seeking full permission to build between the road and Tom Rudd Beck.

It will ask for outline permission for the area of the site north of the beck.

The development has been designed around the beck, providing a corridor between the stream and homes and a new bridge across it. Underwater drainage tanks would be installed to prevent flooding.

The company said the development would create hundreds of new jobs both through Story Homes and contractors and the supply chain.

Adam McNally, development planner for Story Homes, said: “We have been formulating our plans over the last few years, working alongside community and residents groups.

“We have responded to concerns and aspirations raised and put forward a scheme of truly high quality that will positively assimilate into the area and bring a wide range of tangible economic, social and environmental benefits.”

It is the company’s latest plan for housing in West Cumbria.

Its Mabel Wood development at Great Clifton sold out more than a year ahead of schedule. It is also behind developments at Stainburn in Workington, High Harrington and Dearham.

Have your say

I strongly object to the scale and location of this proposed development. Although there may be some extra trade for local businesses this will be outweighed by extra traffic, strain on services, loss of habitat and most importantly the town’s rural character.

Posted by George on 10 June 2014 at 17:34

Cockermouth, is not big enough for a development of this size.

Simples!!!!!!!

Not enough doctors, despite the new hospital, dentists, or school places.

The houses will be bought by people from down south, looking for second homes, who don't want to pay the prices in the Keswick area, as people in the Cumbria area, WON'T be able to buy these houses, not on the wages that we get in the Cumbria area.

So this will only lead to Cumbrian folk, not being able to buy homes in their local areas.

For all the people who say we are NIMBYS, just think, this my soon happen to YOU.

Posted by cockermouth born and bred on 9 June 2014 at 21:58

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